Tag Archives: Potatoes

Smorgasbord Health – Cook from Scratch with Sally and Carol Taylor –

The Potato…A much-loved vegetable and would you believe that about 20 minutes ago I received some pictures, the name of a different Thai Potato which my son had just come across and thought I might like it for my blog…I just love it that people send me pictures and names of fruits and vegetables for my blog so thank you Jamie…much love xx Many thanks to Sally for once again enhancing my recipes with her wonderful vast knowledge of the medicinal and health benefits of the fruit or vegetable we are showcasing each week….xxx

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

Welcome to the Carol Taylor cooking show… with a bit in the front end on the health benefits of the star ingredients from me.

This week a reminder of why potatoes are so good for us.

Most of us walk through the fresh produce departments of our supermarkets without really paying much attention to the individual fruits and vegetables. This is a great pity because the vast majority of these foods have been cultivated for thousands of years, not only for their nutritional value but also for their medicinal properties. If you eat a healthy diet you are effectively practicing preventative medicine and I would like to introduce you to a common vegetable that is definitely on my shopping list.

potatoesThe not so common Potato

You cannot claim Irish ancestry and not be aware of the significance of the potato in our history. For my great-grandfather, as a child…

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Healthy Eating…Potassium

lady holding veggies

 

Potassium is vital to our good health and we need to eat enough potassium each day to maintain a healthy body.  Potassium can be found in every one of our bodies cells and plays a major part in our continued good health. Although let us be clear it is not potassium alone which keeps us healthy.

But to feel our best we should eat enough potassium-rich foods every day to help prevent certain chronic conditions. Regularly not eating enough potassium-rich foods could jeopardise our long-term health in many ways.

Recommended daily amounts:

Adults over the age of 19, adolescents between 14 and 18 years old and pregnant women should consume 4,700 milligrams of potassium each day while limiting themselves to 1,500 mg of sodium.says the Food and Nutrition Board. Nursing women over the age of 14 need more: 5,100 milligrams daily.

Please note however and I always stress this …moderation… but too much can be just as damaging to your health.

The body needs a delicate balance of potassium to help the heart and other muscles work properly. But too much potassium in your blood can lead to dangerous, and possibly deadly, changes in heart rhythm.

Home cooking does determine our intake of potassium but boiling depletes potassium. For example, a boiled potato has almost half the potassium of a baked potato. To preserve potassium, eat fruits and vegetables raw,  roasted or lightly steamed.

Food rather than supplements is always a better option for increasing your intake of nutrients as foods contain fibre as well. Let food be thy medicine is my mantra. I just have this thing about supplements of any sort and maybe it is me but I prefer to eat food rather than take a powder or tablet.

I know what is in my food… That’s me, folks …

Here is a little list for you of foods high in potassium:

  • Winter squash, cubed, 1 cup, cooked: 896 mg
  • Sweet potato, medium, baked with skin on 694 mg
  • Potato, medium, baked with skin: 610 mg
  • White beans, canned, drained, half cup: 595 mg
  • Yoghurt, fat-free, 1 cup: 579 mg
  • Halibut, 3 ounces, cooked: 490 mg
  • 100% orange juice, 8 ounces: 496 mg
  • Broccoli, 1 cup, cooked: 457 mg
  • Cantaloupe, cubed, 1 cup: 431 mg
  • Banana, 1 medium: 422 mg
  • Pork tenderloin, 3 ounces, cooked: 382 mg
  • Lentils, half cup, cooked: 366 mg
  • Milk, 1% low-fat, 8 ounces: 366 mg
  • Salmon, Sustainable fishing, 3 ounces, cooked: 326 mg
  • Pistachios, shelled, 1 ounce, dry roasted: 295 mg
  • Raisins, quarter cup: 250 mg
  • Chicken breast, 3 ounces, cooked: 218 mg
  • Tuna, light, canned, drained, 3 ounces: 201 mg
  • Coconut water, 100 gm: 250 mg

I always get my daily fix of coconut water from a little man up the road when I come back from my daily walk it is a most welcome drink as he always has a chilled one for me… I love it and it does you good…just be careful if you buy coconut water in a bottle or can that it doesn’t have added sugar and the like because it then takes it from that healthy coconut water to something that is not so healthy. Just beware and read the labels I never trust claims on the front of the bottle and it should have an ingredient list of one…Coconut water ..pure and simple…

Fresh Coconut

There is nothing like a healthy drink of Coconut juice fresh from the fruit.

If you take prescribed medication, please before you embark on any change of eating plan always ask your doctor or pharmacist about how all of the medications you take affect the potassium levels in your body, and if you need more, or less, of the mineral.

 

If you enjoy these Healthy eating posts please let me know in comments and reblog or share so everyone can see how easy it is to eat healthily it is just being aware… And I love fudge.. or burfee…

Until next time stay safe, laugh a lot as of all the medicines laughter is the best….

 

 

 

Bubble and Squeak..

Every week is the same…….Left Over Veggies…What does that mean?…Oh yehhhh, Bubble and Squeak!Yummy!  Enjoy!

Originally in the 18th Century, it was made from fried beef and cabbage now it’s lost the beef part and is potatoes and leftover vegetables from the Roast Dinner.

One of the first references of the dish was from a said surprising source  Thomas Bridges ” A burlesque translation of Homer” 1770:

” We, therefore, cooked him up a dish Of lean Bull-Beef, with cabbage fry’d…. Bubble they call this dish, and squeak”

It is so called due to it bubbling up and squeaking whilst over the fire.

By the late 40’s it had lost the meat and was just leftover potatoes and veggies, possible from enforced wartime rationing.

This change was put into print in the 1950 edition of The Good Housekeeping, Home Encyclopedia.

Information source: 

This dish has been a family favorite from leftover potatoes, cabbage, sprouts and other veggies for as long as I can remember.

Now I am introducing it to Asia as a lot of my many friends who hail from all over the world…. Love it!

Let’s Cook!

I hope you do too…..So just mash your leftover potatoes and vegetables together, form a pattie and fry in a little olive oil and butter until nicely browned or as I  did yesterday because we had a few people over we put them on a baking tray and drizzled olive oil over them and cooked in the oven turning halfway through cooking.

Serve with cold meats, salad and whatever else you fancy ( A fried egg)…My American friend had brown sauce, some had tomato ketchup and others mustard.

Enjoy!

 

 

Achari Aloo: Potatoes cooked in Pickling Spices

Oh I love Aloo and normally make with spinach but this is a Aloo with a difference lots of spices sounds lovely and one to make 🙂

cookingwithshy

Food Like A Loving Touch Or A Glimpse Of Divine Power Has The Ability To Comfort…

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Let’s say we all have our Comfort foods.I for one crave a simple meal especially after a busy day at work,perhaps when I’m low and even especially after travelling and being away from home for awhile.It also has a lot to do with the kind of flavours one grew up on.I spent a large part of my childhood with my grandparents.My grandmother was a great cook and while meat and fish dishes were a regular  at the dinner table,she cooked a variety of vegetarian meals as well.And yes potatoes were always the family favourite.She would often make potatoes with onions and spices and this was very often made it to our lunch boxes..There are certain flavour’s that linger on and taste just like childhood.Well here is a recipe that reminds me of my grand mom’s…

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